"What is CBD oil" may be your first question, but the real question we have to answer is, "What does CBD oil do?" CBD interacts with the body through the endocannabinoid system (ECS). First discovered in the late 1980's, the endocannabinoid system regulates the body's homeostasis, or general state of balance. Like an acrobat on a highwire, as the environment around us impacts our normal balance, the endocannabinoid system "connects" by mediating our body's reaction to keep us level.
If you’re new to cannabidiol, you’ll want to start here. Cannabis is known to imbue a wide range of physiological effects. These effects come from a group of complex compounds known as cannabinoids. Scientists have identified over 100 different cannabinoids, but the two most well-known and well-researched are THC and CBD. CBD, or cannabidiol, has become increasingly popular as an ingredient in natural food supplements, offering a variety of potential effects that can benefit the body and mind. Take a look at this information to learn more about CBD.
The endocannabinoid system is found in all mammals, and is made up of millions of cannabinoid receptor sites (CB1 and CB2 receptors) located throughout the body. The endocannabinoid system is one of the regulatory systems in the human body, but most people do very little to support the health of this system, because cannabinoids have not been part of the average diet. If you would like to know more about the technical aspects of the endocannabinoid system, you can go here.
Cannabidiol has low affinity for the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors,[25][26] although it can act as an antagonist of CB1/CB2 agonists despite this low affinity.[26] Cannabidiol may be an antagonist of GPR55, a G protein-coupled receptor and putative cannabinoid receptor that is expressed in the caudate nucleus and putamen in the brain.[27] It also may act as an inverse agonist of GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12.[28] CBD has been shown to act as a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist.[29] It is an allosteric modulator of the μ- and δ-opioid receptors as well.[30] The pharmacological effects of CBD may involve PPARγ agonism and intracellular calcium release.[7]
State and local governments may also regulate CBD. For example, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources issued a rule in June 2019 aligning state CBD regulations with FDA regulations. This means that although recreational marijuana is legal in the state, CDB cannot legally be sold in food or as a dietary supplement under state law.[89]
The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn't mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can't be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can't be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in "cosmetic" products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.
State and local governments may also regulate CBD. For example, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources issued a rule in June 2019 aligning state CBD regulations with FDA regulations. This means that although recreational marijuana is legal in the state, CDB cannot legally be sold in food or as a dietary supplement under state law.[89]
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Prescription medicine (Schedule 4) for therapeutic use containing 2 per cent (2.0%) or less of other cannabinoids commonly found in cannabis (such as ∆9-THC). A schedule 4 drug under the SUSMP is Prescription Only Medicine, or Prescription Animal Remedy – Substances, the use or supply of which should be by or on the order of persons permitted by State or Territory legislation to prescribe and should be available from a pharmacist on prescription.[57] cannabidiol oil
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