CBD comes in many forms, including capsules, extracts, honey-infusions, topical ointments and edibles. But because CBD isn’t FDA-regulated, it’s important to be cautious when choosing a product. In fact, ConsumerLab.com found that the amount of CBD in products may vary widely – from 2 mg to 22 mg per dose – and the strength isn’t always accurately disclosed on the label. (The amount of any incidental THC may not be accurately disclosed either).
The only proven to be good for you range of CBD products that support your health and general well-being. No other CBD product on the market can make these claims or even suggest that their products are good for your health and well-being. Each of our formulations is backed up by substantial scientific data. This has enabled us to present our products with these claims that have been certified and approved for use by the European Food Safety Authority. This really is the first and only well-being product on the market.

Some manufacturers ship CBD products nationally, an illegal action which the FDA did not enforce in 2018, with CBD remaining the subject of an FDA investigational new drug evaluation, and is not considered legal as a dietary supplement or food ingredient as of December 2018.[80][81] Federal illegality has made it difficult historically to conduct research on CBD.[82] CBD is openly sold in head shops and health food stores in some states where such sales have not been explicitly legalized.[83][84]
Since industrial hemp is naturally rich in CBD and has been bred to have only trace amounts of THC, many people today are turning to industrial hemp products as an alternative to medical marijuana. Medical marijuana is not legal in all states in the US and many countries worldwide, while products made from industrial hemp can be a safe and legal alternative. You can get many of the same beneficial effects of medical marijuana from industrial hemp products without getting “high.”
Laboratory evidence indicated that cannabidiol may reduce THC clearance, increasing plasma concentrations which may raise THC availability to receptors and enhance its effect in a dose-dependent manner.[20][21] In vitro, cannabidiol inhibited receptors affecting the activity of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels, which may affect neural activity.[22] A small clinical trial reported that CBD partially inhibited the CYP2C-catalyzed hydroxylation of THC to 11-OH-THC.[23] Little is known about potential drug interactions, but CBD-mediates a decrease in clobazam metabolism.[24]
While marijuana is bred with the only purpose of maximizing its THC concentration, industrial hemp always has trace amounts of THC and naturally occurring high amounts of CBD (it has the highest CBD/THC ratio of all cannabis strains, even Cannabis ruderalis) This means that industrial hemp’s chemical profile makes it incapable of inducing intoxicating effects and getting you “high” from ingesting it.
CBD comes in many forms, including capsules, extracts, honey-infusions, topical ointments and edibles. But because CBD isn’t FDA-regulated, it’s important to be cautious when choosing a product. In fact, ConsumerLab.com found that the amount of CBD in products may vary widely – from 2 mg to 22 mg per dose – and the strength isn’t always accurately disclosed on the label. (The amount of any incidental THC may not be accurately disclosed either).
As we have also seen above, CBD is considered to have wider applications than THC. Since CBD has been much less studied than THC, scientists assume that there are many new applications of CBD that haven’t yet been discovered. On the other hand, THC’s applications are more or less completely explored by now due to all the research on medical marijuana over the past decade.
Yes, CBD derived from hemp plants is legal in the U.S. Growing, processing, and selling hemp and hemp-derived products for commercial purposes in the United States is permitted. While previously hemp was only legal to grow for hemp pilot programs and research needs, the passage of the 2018 bill reclassified hemp as an agricultural commodity and made it legal to produce all hemp-derived products, including CBD oil.

Hemp-producing cannabis has tall, fibrous stalks that are very strong and have very few flowering buds. On the other hand, marijuana strains are short, bushy, and have high amounts of THC. In fact, industrial hemp and medical marijuana are so distinctively different that most lay people wouldn’t be able to tell that they belong to the same genus of plants if they encountered them in the wild!
However, when cannabinoids are taken externally, it’s difficult to distinguish between the clinically desirable effects and the therapeutically undesirable effects of various phytocannabinoids. This is because cannabinoid receptors send a variety of signals that often interconnect to coordinate the body’s functions, so it’s hard to tell them apart.
The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn't mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can't be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can't be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in "cosmetic" products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.
In September 2018, following its approval by the FDA for rare types of childhood epilepsy,[12] Epidiolex was rescheduled (by the Drug Enforcement Administration) as a Schedule V drug to allow for its prescription use.[72] This allows GW Pharmaceuticals to sell Epidiolex, but it does not apply broadly and all other CBD-containing products remain Schedule I drugs.[72] Epidiolex still requires rescheduling in some states before it can be prescribed in those states.[75][76] cannabidiol oil
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