Let’s start with the basics. Phytocannabinoids are the naturally occurring cannabinoids found in the cannabis and hemp plants. What’s a cannabinoid, you ask? Well, to put it simply they are the chemical compounds produced by cannabis flowers that scientists and doctors have discovered can be useful for treating a variety of ailments, from nausea to arthritis. Now, there are two cannabinoid, Cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but the one that seems to have the most health benefits is the CBD. Still with us so far? Ok good!
Activated hemp is one of the leading ingredients in the cultivation process for hemp pet nutrition. These phytochemicals are formulated from whole plant extracts, which produces a natural and safe supplement for your pet. The abundance of hemp in our products come from the activated hemp, which has been carefully cultivated in U.S. soil and formulated and processed in U.S. laboratories.
But I'm not comfortable giving my dog something I wouldn't try for myself, because I am a crazy dog lady. So that's what I did. I bought "Holistic Hound CBD Dog Treats" in pasture raised savory chicken-flavor and "Treatibles Hemp Wellness Dog Chews with naturally occurring CBD" in blueberry, and, on two separate evenings, I hunkered down to eat them.
These gluten-free treats, made with chicken soup, will satisfy the pickiest of eaters with their umami taste. I have a picky dog that routinely turns down treats from strangers if they don’t smell good enough—no Milk-Bones accepted—so I’m constantly looking for the smelliest, most pungent treats to give her. Unfortunately, premium juicy meat treats tend to leave stains in my pockets. But you get the best of both worlds with these biscuits: savory taste with yuck-free packaging.
While hemp seed oil is made from the seeds of the plant, it has very little CBD, not enough to provide pain or anxiety relief.  I've been using CBD oil with my dogs for a few years with my dogs and I love the idea of incorporating CBD dog treats into their diet because treats can taken on a drive, a walk, or to the vet's office with no mess.  I've spilled a 1/4 of a bottle of essential oils into my bag once.  That sucked.  It would suck even more if it was a bottle of CBD oil.  CBD dog treats are also an excellent option for dogs, like Sydney, that don't like CBD oil.
The calming effects of CBD work very well with high-strung dogs who struggle with separation anxiety, depression, and noise phobias. Dogs who experience severe separation anxiety are often depressed or anxious when their guardians leave them alone and it may result in disruptive and destructive behaviors, such as drooling, urinating, barking, chewing on objects and pacing. 
The CBD dog treats that my dogs tried are $60 a bag for 30 dog treats. Wow! That's a lot of money and something that I wouldn't even THINK of spending five years ago.  I will buy a bag of these treats for Rodrigo.  Today, I look at this as a steal because the treats work, the company use quality, safe, natural ingredients, and I don't worry about long-term side effects.

We received a bag of cbdMD dog treats along with CBD oil and other products in exchange for our honest thoughts.  What surprised me was that cbdMD offers dog treats in various strengths, so I requested 750 mg dog treats (I'm used to 200 mg).  And they worked – I saw a difference within 30 minutes.  The first time the dogs tried their new dog treats by cbdMD, I was sitting in my office, fireworks were STILL going off two weeks after the Fourth of July and Rodrigo was panting and trying to get as close to me as possible.
A newer pet food product category getting a lot of buzz at US pet trade shows the past two years has been pet treats and supplements featuring cannabidiol (CBD). Sorry for the bad pun; this oil derives from the hemp plant, though a different species than ones containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient in marijuana responsible for the psychoactive reaction, or high (buzz), in people or animals who imbibe it. CBD does not cause the same reaction, say its proponents in the pet industry.
I am not a veterinarian or canine/animal nutritionist. I am a blogger, and all information shared is based on my personal experience with my four dogs and research about raw feeding, canine health, and nutrition that I do for my four dogs.  Please do not use content from this blog in place of veterinarian care.  I do not offer coaching or consultations; the most I can do is share my personal experience.
Disclosure: This is a sponsored post.  I received payment, CBD dog treats, CBD oil, and other CBD products in exchange for freelance writing, social media promotion, and sharing my honest thoughts on cbdMD products. Thoughts shared in this post and on social media for Keep the Tail Wagging®, are honest and based on my experience with my dogs, products I use, try or test, and the research I've done in an effort to raise my dogs naturally.  If you have any questions about this or other sponsored posts, please feel free to contact me via the contact page of this blog.  Thank you.
The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.

Veterinarians’ views on pets being treated with CBD vary widely, with some citing the lack of scholarly literature on it specifically in relation to pets. Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates pet food in the US, decidedly does not approve of CBD. “With regard to its use in food, FDA's position is that CBD … is an unapproved drug, hence any food (including animal feed or pet food) containing it would be actionable as an adulterated product,” wrote David A. Dzanis, DVM, PhD, DACVN, in a recent Petfood Insights column.
Sales of CBD pet products doubled in the US from 2014 to 2016, according to MJ Freeway, a data analytics firm referenced by Polly Mosendz in a December 2016 article on Bloomberg.com. Interestingly, the article lumps CBD in the same category as THC, even questioning the ethics of “getting the dog high” (paraphrasing a quote from a senior vice president of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).
But I'm not comfortable giving my dog something I wouldn't try for myself, because I am a crazy dog lady. So that's what I did. I bought "Holistic Hound CBD Dog Treats" in pasture raised savory chicken-flavor and "Treatibles Hemp Wellness Dog Chews with naturally occurring CBD" in blueberry, and, on two separate evenings, I hunkered down to eat them.
Scientific research has shown that cannabidiol does not operate, or at least operates very weakly, on the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the brain. Those two receptors are the ones most powerfully influenced by THC, which creates the cognitive changes associated with feeling “high” or “stoned.” In fact, the CBD found in dog treats counteracts and suppresses the effects of THC. Cannabidiol binds to different receptors that suppress pain, moderate body temperature, alleviate pain, and lessen anxiety, among other effects.

A lot of pet owners want nothing but the best for their pets and CBD may be the answer to that. There are dog treats that have CBD in them which you can use for your pet. Nowadays in the holistic pet market, you can expect that more CBD products are coming your way and that they will be safe for your pets to use. There are dog treats as well as topical creams that can help your pet deal with the kind of pain and illnesses that they feel. It can help when you are aware of the effects that CBD will have for your pet.


The primary claims of reputable CBD treats for dogs revolve around cannabidiol’s effects on the brain and the body. They are not a cure for any particular ailment; they are used as palliatives for a number of neurological and persistent pain conditions. We are not trying to make claims ourselves for their effectiveness, simply reporting that these treats have been used specifically for the following purposes:

Honestly, these treats resemble peanut butter cookies that I make for my fellow human beings—with the added nutrition of carrots for your dog. If you told me they were peanut butter munchies for me, I’d definitely accept them without question and dole them out to my friends at a party. But they’re for dogs—gourmet, fancy dogs! And they contain 5mg of Colorado-cultivated CBD per biscuit.
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