In treat or biscuit form, with tastes and flavors that appeal to dogs, CBD treats may work for dogs who refuse, reject, or are resistant to medications in pill or tablet form. They may also be useful for dogs who are not keen on injections or for whom standard medicines have proven ineffective. Given the skepticism surrounding medical uses of cannabis, CBD treats should be approached when other avenues have been exhausted, and only after thorough conversations with a veterinarian.
Honestly, these treats resemble peanut butter cookies that I make for my fellow human beings—with the added nutrition of carrots for your dog. If you told me they were peanut butter munchies for me, I’d definitely accept them without question and dole them out to my friends at a party. But they’re for dogs—gourmet, fancy dogs! And they contain 5mg of Colorado-cultivated CBD per biscuit.
Yes! I’ve seen SO much about CBD oil recently, but I’m hesitant to try it since it seems like a fad. I also feel like some are definitely better quality than others. The ones I’ve seen haven’t been as expensive, but I never really thought about dosage etc. Thanks for your review, Kermit has a vet appointment coming up for his yearly check up, I’ll ask about CBD oil. He’s pretty good in general but sometimes gets too hype over certain things (though we’re working with a trainer too).
All available evidence indicates that long-term use of Hemp Treats causes no long-term side effects. However, Hemp CBD has only truly been available for pets for the last few years, so there is of course still time to find an issue. However, phytocannabinoids work naturally in the body because they act like self-created cannabinoids — they can increase their concentrations, as well as attach to the same receptors.
Honestly, these treats resemble peanut butter cookies that I make for my fellow human beings—with the added nutrition of carrots for your dog. If you told me they were peanut butter munchies for me, I’d definitely accept them without question and dole them out to my friends at a party. But they’re for dogs—gourmet, fancy dogs! And they contain 5mg of Colorado-cultivated CBD per biscuit.
Sales of CBD pet products doubled in the US from 2014 to 2016, according to MJ Freeway, a data analytics firm referenced by Polly Mosendz in a December 2016 article on Bloomberg.com. Interestingly, the article lumps CBD in the same category as THC, even questioning the ethics of “getting the dog high” (paraphrasing a quote from a senior vice president of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).
Treatibles makes a wide variety of products, from CBD infused treats to oils and even gel caps. This company also produces its treat in a number of different flavors, and even makes grain free products so even those with especially sensitive stomachs can enjoy the benefits that CBD yields. The company also has some specific feeding instructions, recommending 1mg of oil for every 10 lbs your pup weighs.
More and more pet parents are turning to a key component of marijuana derivatives in order to bring some much needed relief to their anxious, sick, or aging pups. CBD, phytocannabinoid, and hemp oil have all been used and recommended to people for years, and more recently several state governments have approved their use as medicine. A few new companies are focusing on providing CBD for dogs in order to live a better quality of life without the need to load up on pharmaceutical pain killers and calming products.
However, there are veterinarians that support THC-free hemp supplements for animals. Miami-based veterinarian Dr. Patricia Khuly, VMD, has recommended hemp supplements to her patients, and has even made homemade versions using hemp oil for her pets. “I find they can be somewhat effective as part of a well rounded chronic pain protocol,” she tells Leafly—though she has never used them for pet anxiety or improving fur and skin. “Hemp oil sounds interesting for use in the same way fish oil would be implemented for these other indications,” she adds, “especially for my vegan clients who prefer to source non-animal based products for their pets.” She would like to see more research first, though.
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