John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, and publisher who earned his English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Urbana (USA). He is the co-founder of a literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and calls the most beautiful places in the world his office. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve. tlc oil


Hemp seed oil is manufactured from varieties of Cannabis sativa that do not contain significant amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive element present in the cannabis plant. This manufacturing process typically includes cleaning the seed to 99.99% before pressing the oil. There is no THC within the hemp seed, although trace amounts of THC may be found in hemp seed oil when plant matter adheres to the seed surface during manufacturing. The modern production of hemp seed oil, particularly in Canada, has successfully lowered THC values since 1998.[3] Regular accredited sampling of THC in Canadian hemp seed oil shows THC levels usually below detection limit of 4 ppm (parts per million, or 4 mg/kg). Legal limit for THC content in foodstuffs in Canada is 10 ppm.[4] Some European countries have limits of 5 ppm or none-detected, some EU countries do not have such limits at all.

This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Hemp is often mistaken for its cannabis cousin, marijuana, even though smoking an entire garbage bag of hemp would not produce an altered state of consciousness, as hemp contains low levels of THC. Confusion between hemp oil and marijuana oil has spiked recently, as states have passed medical marijuana laws that allow for the use of strains of marijuana that are low in THC and high in CBD. Consumers often confuse hemp oil with CBD oil because both are low in THC and contain CBD.
Hemp is a controversial crop in some regions of the world, due to concerns about psychoactive plants in the Cannabis genus. In some regions, cultivation of hemp is banned, although products made from hemp such as oil, hemp garments, and hemp paper may be legal. In other areas, hemp is permitted, but only industrial hemp, and some nations freely permit cultivation of all plants in this genus, assuming that regulation is a more efficient technique for control than outright bans. Wild hemp is also not uncommon in some regions of the world, making it difficult to enforce bans on hemp crops.
Although hemp was once the most important cash crop in the United States — more so than corn and wheat combined — hemp was banned and classified as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. While classification as a Schedule I drug meant hemp could no longer be grown in the U.S., products containing hemp, such as lotions, fabric and food, are legal for purchase in the U.S. and are often found at natural and health food retailers including Whole Foods, Costco and Sprouts grocers.
To access CBD oil, a solvent extraction process is required, which returns roughly 3-5 grams of oil per ounce of flower product used. Using grain or isopropyl alcohol as a solvent, you can strain the result of the mixture, leaving CBD oil behind. It is a lengthy process, and in countries where cannabis is legal, there are many places to access high-quality CBD oil.
Cannabis Oil produced and sold by "dealers" can have many contaminants and many times will have minimal amounts or no THC or CBD in them at all. Most of the time cannabis oil available on the street should be avoided for medicinal uses such as treating cancer. It's always better to make your own oil or to have someone you trust make your oil. This helps assure a very pure, high quality oil is obtained. If you know who made your oil, you can better know what you are getting in your oil.
In 1937, the U.S. Treasury Department introduced the “Marihuana Tax Act,” which imposed a levy of $1 per ounce for “health-focused” use of cannabis and $100 per ounce for recreational use. This was opposed by physicians who were not required to pay a special tax for prescribing cannabis, use special order forms to obtain it and keep records detailing its professional use. The American Medical Association believed that evidence of cannabis’ harmful effects was limited and the act would prevent further research into its worth health-wise.
Our understanding of CBD cannabis oil has expanded and we’re more aware today than ever of the cannabinoid’s potential. Studies on CBD’s natural health benefits are extensive and groundbreaking research is being done regularly. We suggest you review the wide body of scientific research on CBD to get a better understanding of the cannabinoid’s health value. We answer the  “Will CBD get you high?” question here.
In terms of eye health, cannabis and cannabis essential oil have been linked to a reduction in glaucoma and prevention of macular degeneration, according to a report published by Dr. John Merritt, Department of Ophthalmology School of Medicine, University of North Carolina. Eye health is one of the major reasons why people turn to cannabis essential oil as they age.

There are other types of omega-3 fatty acids, but the other omega-3s are typically found in marine animals and plants or fortified products, like eggs. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans currently recommend the consumption of 1.1 to 1.6 grams of ALA each day as part of a healthy diet. However, a 2019 study in the Proceedings of Nutrition Society Journal has said that this value may go up to a total of 2 grams of ALA per day.
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About 49% of the weight of hempseed is an edible oil[5] that contains 76% as essential fatty acids; i.e., omega-6 fatty acids including linoleic acid (LA, 54%) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 3%), omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 17%) in addition to monounsaturated fat (5% to 11%) and stearidonic acid (2%).[6] Hemp seed oil contains 5% to 7% saturated fat.[5][6] In common with other oils, hemp seed oil provides 9 kcal/g. Compared with other culinary oils it is low in saturated fatty acids.[6]
The oil contained in the hemp seed is 75-80% polyunsaturated fatty acids (the good fats) and only 9-11% of the less desired saturated fatty acids. Hemp seed oil is reputed to be the most unsaturated oil derived from the plant kingdom. The essential fatty acids contained in hemp seed oil are required in our diet more than any other vitamin, yet our bodies do not naturally produce them. They must be obtained from external sources in the food we eat. Essential fatty acids are involved with producing life's energy throughout the human body and without them, life is not possible. In general, North Americans have a high dietary deficiency in essential fatty acids due to our high intake of animal fats versus plant fats, caused by our high consumption of processed foods and meats versus natural organic foods.
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