Hemp was used extensively by the United States during World War II to make uniforms, canvas, and rope.[144] Much of the hemp used was cultivated in Kentucky and the Midwest. During World War II, the U.S. produced a short 1942 film, Hemp for Victory, promoting hemp as a necessary crop to win the war.[143] U.S. farmers participated in the campaign to increase U.S. hemp production to 36,000 acres in 1942.[145] This increase amounted to more than 20 times the production in 1941 before the war effort.[145]


Since hemp seed is very low in sodium and calories and is a complete protein, it can be eaten in large quantities without fear of gaining too much weight. Complete proteins make the body feel full because all of the necessary amino acids have been taken in through food, thereby inhibiting the release of ghrelin and curbing hunger pains. This reduces the chances of overeating and subsequent weight gain. Also, fiber makes the body feel full and stimulates good digestion and fast passage of bowels, which can reduce weight and increase the efficient absorption of nutrients.
Hemp, or industrial hemp, is a strain of the Cannabis sativa plant species that is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its derived products.[1] It is one of the fastest growing plants[2] and was one of the first plants to be spun into usable fiber 10,000 years ago.[3] It can be refined into a variety of commercial items, including paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation, biofuel, food, and animal feed.[4][5]
There are no known allergic reactions to hemp seed, but the contact that the seeds may have had with THC-covered plant parts could result in small residues of THC on the seeds. This means that you could possibly experience the feeling of being “high” or under the effect of the psychotropic chemical. This effect of hemp seed is quite rare and isn’t harmful, but it can be an uncomfortable feeling if not anticipated.
For profitable hemp farming, particularly deep, humus-rich, nutrient-rich soil with controlled water flow is preferable. Waterlogged acidic, compressed or extremely light (sandy) soils primarily affect the early development of plants.[citation needed] Steep and high altitudes of more than 400 m above sea level are best avoided. Hemp is relatively insensitive to cold temperatures and can withstand frost down to −5 °C.[citation needed] Seeds can germinate down to 1–3 °C.[citation needed] Hemp needs a lot of heat, so earlier varieties come to maturation. The water requirement is 300–500 l/kg dry matter.[citation needed] This is around 1/14th that of cotton, which takes between 7,000 and 29,000 l/kg, according to WWF.[citation needed] Roots can grow up to 3 feet into the soil and use water from deeper soil layers.

In the early 1990s, industrial hemp agriculture in North America began with the Hemp Awareness Committee at the University of Manitoba. The Committee worked with the provincial government to get research and development assistance, and was able to obtain test plot permits from the Canadian government. Their efforts led to the legalization of industrial hemp (hemp with only minute amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol) in Canada and the first harvest in 1998.[85][86] benefits of cbd oil
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